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From my book "Line of Descent of George Roger Gilbert"

THE TIFFANY FAMILY

In Part 3 of this my book, on pages 335 and 336, is a discussion concerning my finding two different Tiffany genealogies and the inconsistencies between them. In that discussion are the reasons I believe the following account is the most accurate.

Saturday, June 30, 1973

Again to the Syracuse Public Library, Started late today so didn't get there until 12:45 PM..

NEXT - I copied TIFFANY FAMILY "MY ANCESTERS" compiled by Ella F. Wright Idlewood, Waterbury, Connecticut.

here it is .....

NOTES ON HUMPHREY TIFFANY

"Records of ancient Rehoboth, History of New Plymouth, by Baylin, Volumn 1, page 209, January 22, 1663, Humphrey Tiffany permitted to be a sojourner and to buy and hire."

"The town of Rehoboth, Massachusetts was incorporated 1645 and contained the town of Seekonk, Rehoboth, Attleboro, Swansea, Massachusetts and Pawtucket, Rhode Island."

"Att the General Court holden att Plymouth the first day of March, Anno Domino, 1663, 'Humphrey Tiffany made a complaint against an Indian for abuse received.' "

"Humphrey Tiffany, Rehoboth, 1663, by wife Elizabeth had Sarah born July 6, 1683, and was an inhabitant of Dover for some time but killed July 15, 1685, on the journey between Swanzey and Boston by a stroke of lightening." .. SAVAGE

"From Massachusetts Historical Society, Volumn 14, page 125 - 'July 15, 1685, Humphrey Tiffany and Frances Low traveling betwix Swansey and Boston were slain with lightening.' "

Plymouth Colony Records, Volumn 6, page 175 - " Att General Court of his Maj'ties holden att Plymouth, October 27, 1685, administration is granted by this court to Elizabeth, the relict of Humphrey Tiffany deceased, on all the good and chattels of sd. Tiffeney she bringing in a true inventory thereof and giving bond with two sufficient sureties for her administrating according to law. Major John Walley is ordered by the court to give ye oath to the inventory of sd. Tiffany and to deliver her the letter of administration granted by the court, he having given a bond as afore sd.."

"Hezeriah, the son of Humphrey Tiffinee and of Elizabeth, his wife, was drowned in Swansey River on the fourth of December near night, anno 1685." From town records of Swansea, Massachusetts, furnished by town clerk, Henry O. Wood.

From the vital records of Rehoboth, page 917, Humphrey Tiffany's heirs are quoted as proprietors not inhabitants, February 7, 1689, of property in Rehoboth.

The emigration of the sons of Humphrey Tiffany was for a time limited to short distances. We hear of James at Attleboro, Massachusetts, 1693, Thomas, his brother, first at Bristol, Rhode Island; Consider, and Ephraim seem to have found their way to the Colony known as Block Island, May 4, 1669. Here - per New Shoreham records furnished by town clerk of New Shoreham - Consider Tiffany and Abigail Niles were married and had children. Here also his brother, Ephraim ( of whose descendants this history deals), and wife Leshia, had issue.


Generation 2nd


Decent Humphrey (1), Ephraim (2)


Ephriam (2), son of Humphrey (1) and Elizabeth Tiffany married Leshia _____ and had issue born in New Shoreham, Block Island, R. I..

1. Samuel (3) b. April 7, 1701; 2. Consider (3) b. April 28, 1703; 3. Humphrey (3) b. February 7, 1706.

Ephraim and his brother Consider (2) bought a large tract of land in Lyme, Conn. June 22, 1701. Consider (2) moved to Lyme and made a number of transfers of real estate from time to time. Ephraim did not settle in Lyme till late in 1706 or the first part of 1707, judging from an agreement between him and his partners, Ball and Banning. For a long time I find no transfers in his name but he was living in Lyme, Conn. in 1724, and died there previous to 1734. Was living in 1732.


Generation 3rd


Decent: Humphrey (1), Ephraim (2), Consider (3).


2. Consider (3) son of Ephraim (2) and Leshia Tiffany, born in New Shoreham, R. I., April 28, 1703, married (per Lyme records), Naomy Comstock, Nov. 26, 1731. Naomy died May 29, 1743.

Issue:

1. Consider (4) b. March 15, 1733, in Lyme, Conn.

2. Luther (4) b. April 15, 1734 in Lyme, Conn.

3. Naomy (4) b. December 28. 1737 in Lyme, Conn.

4. Samuel (4) b. July 13, 1740 in Lyme, Conn.

5. Umphrey (4) b. March 2, 1743 in Lyme, Conn.

married 2nd Mary Davis of New London, Conn. January 23, 175___.

Issue: born in Lyme, Conn.

6. Timothy (4) b. November 24, 1752

7. Titus (4) b. May 9, 1754.


From this point on Ella Wright follows the family of Consider (4) from whom she is descended. His first child was Jemima Tiffany b. Oct. 12, 1756; m. Ebenezer Crane.


Wednesday, July 11, 1973

Drove to Hartford, Connecticut from Port Jervis, New York and visited the Connecticut State Library. In the Genealogy and History room there are card catalogue files containing Census, Church Records, Vital Statistics, war records, probate files and Book Shelves of published Genealogies.

Here is what I found:

I found also a Tiffany Genealogy ^ and from that a Comstock Genealogy all of which I will put in the red record book " Herald Square".

In the Tiffany genealogy it was mentioned that Consider Tiffany's wife , Samuel Tiffany's mother, was unknown. I looked through the records and found.


Lyme Vital Records - Vol. L-6, pg 316.

Tiffany, Samuel - son of Consider and Neomey, born July 13, 1740

Tiffany, Consider - married Neomey Comstock, November 26, 1731


Neomey Comstock's mother was Neomey Niles or Noyes. She is listed in the Noyes genealogy as a daughter of Moses Noyes with a penciled in remark - "wrong - she is the dau. of Benjamin Niles.".

I consulted the records of Births, Marriages and deaths and found:


Lyme Vital Records - Vol. L-2, pg 10.

Niles, Neomey - Dau. Benjamin ; married William Comstock, September 10, 1695

Saturday, May 4, 1974

To the Syracuse Public Library.From the New England Biographical and Genealogical Record. . . . . .

Old Lyme, Connecticut - Inscriptions vol. (77 - 194; 78 - 250)

Vol. 78 page 376 - Naomi, wife of Mr. Consider Tiffany, died May 29, 1743 in her 36th year, "Behold my children, here I ly."


Wednesday, March 13, 1996

Went again to the Onondaga County Library on Warren Street in Syracuse, NY. I was mainly in search of the parents of Abigail Curtis who married Samuel Tiffany. . . . . . . My primary purpose was to locate and identify the parents of Abigail Curtis, the reported wife of Samuel Tiffany. Their marriage and birth of their children were reported in the genealogy I have as occuring in Lyme, Conn. so I began with the Lyme Vital Records.

Tiffany -

Consider was born ye 15th of March, 1732/3

Luther was born ye 15th of April 1734

Neomey was born ye 28th of December 1737

Neomey married Ezekiel Huntly

Samuel was born ye 13th of July 1740

Humphrey was born ye 2nd day of March 1743

Neomey the wife of Consider Tiffany died ye 29th

day of May 1743

Humphrey was buried Jan. 5, 1788 aged 82


I am placing portions of the following genealogy here for the reader to compare it with what I have collected and written about Humphrey Tiffany and his descendants. The author makes no mention of an Ephraim as a child of Humphrey but does say " There were possibly other children, but there is no positive proof. " Since he thought Humphrey did not father an Ephraim, he assumed that Consider, Humphrey's son, was the father of Samuel. In a different genealogy, seen later in this section, Samuel's Father, Consider, is the grandson of Humphrey. The fact that this author did not know the name of Consider's wife, shows he did not look at the Lyme, Connecticut records and therefore casts doubt on the credibility of his conclusion. Here follows excerpts from the first Tiffany genealogy:


THE TIFFANY FAMILY IN AMERICA


"Although the most diligent search has been made, both through the records of this country and of Europe, it has been impossible to ascertain the exact date at which the original Tiffany came to America. The lists of emigrants to America have been carefully studied; also other records, including many of the genealogies published in this country and across the water. Several names that might be construed to mean Tiffany appear, but, as there is so much doubt concerning them, they have not been used in the compilation of data for this work.

The earliest Tiffany mentioned in colonial history is Squire Humphrey, who is undoubtedly the ancestor of the majority of Tiffanys in America. Squire Humphrey Tiffany probably went to Massachusetts Bay about the year 1660. Authentic records show that the town of Rehoboth, Mass., was incorporated in 1645, and , as originally incorporated, contained the present towns of Seekonk, Rehoboth, Attleboro, parts of Swansea, Mass. , and Pawtucket, R.I. In the records of the town of ancient Rehoboth, Bayliss' History of New Plymouth, Vol. I., page 209, under date of January 22, 1663, state, "Humphrey Tiffany permitted to be a sojourner and to buy or hire." At this date, therefore, Humphrey Tiffany became a citizen of the town. In Savage's Genealogical History of New England Families who came to America before May 1692, on page 300, Vol. IV., under the heading of Tiffany, apears the following:

"Tiffany, Humphrey, Rehoboth, 1663, b. w. Elizabeth, had Sarah, b. sixth July, 1683, was I think inhab. of Dover for some time, but k. 15, July 1685, on the journey betw. Sansey and Boston, by a stroke of lightning."

Savage is mistaken about Humphrey having lived in Dover, N.H. Thorough search of Dover records and all other sources of information concerning the county of Rockingham, in which Dover lies, fails to reveal that any member of the Tiffany family lived in Dover.

What is now Swansea, Mass., was part of the original town of Rehoboth. In the Plymouth Colony Records, among the Swansea items appears the following:

Sara, the dau. of Humphrey Tiffany, and Elizabeth his wife, was born sixth of July 1683.

This shows that two years before Humphrey's death he was living in Swansea, Mass. and not in Dover, N.H. Further proof that he was a resident of Swansea at the time of his death is given on page 88, Vol. V., fifth series, Publications of the Massachusetts Historical Society, in the Diary of Samuel Sewell, as follows:

"Wednesday, P.M., July 15, 1685. Very dark and great thunder and lightning. One Humphrey Tiffany and Frances Low, daughter of Antony Low, are slain with the lightning and thunder about a mile or a mile and a half beyond Billings Farm, the horse also slain, that they rode on, and another Horse in Company slain and his rider who held the garment on the Maid to steady it at the time of the Stroke a coat or cloak, stounded but not killed. Were coming to Boston. Antony Low being in Town the sad Bill was put up with (regards) of that solemn judgement of God; Fast-day forenoon, July 15, 1685, 2 persons 2 horses."

This gives the date of Humphrey Tiffany's death in a satisfactory manner, and shows that he was on his way from the direction of Swansea toward Boston at the time he was killed.

Another record state that Humphrey Tiffany was killed by lightning between Swansea and Boston, and that for a long time a metal tablet was affixed to a large tree, beneath which he sought shelter during the storm and was killed. The word tree was used to rhyme with Tiffany in the inscription on the tablet, setting forth the incident in which Humphrey Tiffany and his companion were killed. The inscription concluded with the following:


Squire Humphrey Tiffany

And Mistress Low,

By a stroke of lightning

Into Eternity did go.


Further proof of his residence is found on pages 51-54, Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. IV., also in the Court Orders contained in Vol. VI., in which the following appears:

Att. a General Court of this Holden att plimouth Oct. 27, 1685. Before Thomas Hinckley, Esq., Govern and others.

Administration is granted by this Court to Elizabeth, the relict of Humphrey Tiffany, deceased, on all the goods and chattells of sd. Tiffany, she bringing in a true inventory thereof, and giveing bond with two sufficient sureties for her adminstring according to law. Major John Walley is ordered by the Court to give ye oath to the inventory of sd. Tiffany, and to deliver her the letter of administration granted by the Court, she haveing given in bond as above said.

Mistress Elizabeth Tiffany qualified before the General Court as executrix of her husband's estate. From the time Humphrey Tiffany is first heard of, he is found to be is resident of the Plymouth colony of Massachusetts Bay, and especially of the part known as Swansea, so named because it was originally settled by emigrants from the town of Swansea in Wales.

Records of the present town of Swansea give the names of Squire Humphrey Tiffany's children and some of his grandchildren. In the town book appears the following:

"Hezekiah the son of Humphrey Tiffanee and of Elizabeth his wife was drowned in Swansey River on the 4th of December near night Ann. 1685."

This was the same year in which Humphrey Tiffany was killed.

The children of whom there is actual proof are the following, all of whom are numbered the second generation:


2 James

2 Thomas

2 Ebenezer

2 Consider

2 Sarah, b. July 6, 1683

2 Hezekiah, d. December 4, 1685


There were possibly other children, but there is no positive proof.


CONSIDER, SECOND BRANCH

Generation Second


2. CONSIDER (1 Humphrey). Records are not clear as to which of Humphrey Tiffany's sons Consider Tiffany was; but he was twice married. The name of his first wife is not known; but the names of some of her children have been preserved. The probablitiy is, that he and his brother Ephraim Tiffany ^ were the founders of the Tiffany branches, with descendants now living in Lyme, Hadlyme, Salem, Somers, Hartland and other plaes near these towns.

Children by first marriage:

2131. i. CONSIDER, b. Lyme, Conn., March 15, 1730; d. Hartford, Conn., June 19, 1796.

2132 ii. DANIEL .

2133 iii. SAMUEL, b. Lyme, Conn., 1740; d. Tomkins, N.Y. ^

Children by second marriage

2134. iv. TIMOTHY, b. Lyme, Conn., November 24, 1765; d. Barkhurst, Mass., 1841

2135 v. TITUS, b. Lyme, Conn., May 9, 1754


THOMAS, SECOND BRANCH ^

Generation Second


Descent: Humphrey (1), Thomas (2)

Thomas, son of Humphrey (1) and Elizabeth Tiffany, born 1665-70, married 1689, Hannah ______, in Swansea, Massachusetts, died March 7, 1734, in Ashford, Connecticut. About 1698, Thomas went to Bristol, Rhode Island, then to the new town of Ashford, Connecticut. The records of his three eldest children are in Swansea and the records of the Church of Christ in Bristol, Connecticut show that five of his children were baptized there. Records show he bought a great deal of land in Ashford, and for those times was a large land holder. He held office as selectman, from 1735 to 1741, and of town clerk from 1721 to 1748, with the exception of two years.

ISSUE: 1. Eliezer (3), born April 13, 1690; 2. W. Thomas (3), born May 22, 1692; 3. Recompense (3), born March 11, 1694; 4. Isaiah (3), born 1698; 5. Edward (3), baptized 1706; 6. Nathaniel (3), baptized in Bristol, Rhode Island, 1706


Generation Third

Descent: Humphrey (1), Thomas (2), Nathaniel (3)


6. Nathaniel (3), son of Thomas (2) and Hannah _________ Tiffany baptized 1706, married September 6, 1726, Keziah Ward, and moved to Somers, Connecticut.

ISSUE: 1. Keziah (4), born June 2, 1727. 2. Nathaniel (4) born May 1, 1731 in Ashford, Connecticut. 3. Nathan (4) , born May 4, 1733. 4. John (4), born December 10, 1741, died September 20, 1742. 5. Mary (4), born March 14, 1744. 6. John (4), born November 17, 1747.


Generation Fourth

Descent: Humphrey (1), Thomas (2), Nathaniel (3), Nathaniel (4)


2. Nathaniel (4), son of Nathaniel (3) and Keziah Ward Tiffany, born May 1, 1731 (Ashford, Connecticut), married December 16, 1752, in Somers, Connecticut, Zeriah Jones.

ISSUE: 1. Zeriah (5), born July 16, 1753. 2. Sybil (5), born October 29, 1756. 3. Nathaniel (5), born March 25, 1759, died in infancy. 4. Nathaniel (5), born February 13, 1760 in Somers, Connecticut. 5. Rhoda (5), born July 21, 1762. 6. Samuel (5), born April 13, 1769. 7. Charles (5), born July 20, 1771 died in infancy. 8. Betsey (5), born February 20, 1774. 9. Charles (5), born August 3, 1776.


Generation Fifth

Descent: Humphrey (1), Thomas (2), Nathaniel (3), Nathaniel (4), Nathaniel (5)

4. Nathaniel (5), son of Nathaniel (4) and Zeriah Jones Tiffany, born February 13, 1760, died June 30, 1835, married Lucy _________, about 1787.


ISSUE: 1. Cloe (6), born March 20, 1788. 2. Lucy (6), born April 21, 1790. 3. Rhoda (6), born September 26, 1793, died in infancy.

Lucy died March 23, 1796. Nathaniel married second Elizabeth Bartlett in 1797.


ISSUE: 1. John (6), born August 14, 1798. 2. Rhoda (6), born October 4, 1804. 3. Clarissa (6), born January 18, 1804.^ 4. Levi (6), born May 22, 1806 in Somers Connecticut. 5. Betsey (6), born May 22, 1811. 6. Harriet M. (6), born August 4, 1816. 7. Julia (6).


As a point of interest I am adding this section from THE TIFFANY FAMILY IN AMERICA.


" PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

It is thought best to trace the history of the Tiffanys from their earliest known English origin. The American branch is made up of English, Irish and Scotch. The family has inherited, to a marked degree, the sturdy, determined characteristics of these three nationalities. The Tiffanys are, as a rule, physically strong, from medium to large stature, many being over six feet in height. They are too high-spirited and active to take on a superabundance of flesh, are stately in bearing, erect in carriage, quick and clear-cut in movement, and have large head, the upper brain developed in excess of the base.

The head is well carried on a sturdy neck. The chest is deep, the lungs large and full, the body and limbs round, well knit, closely jointed. The shoulders are inclined to droop, with the arms carried close to the body. Skin and hair are fine in texture, nails are thin, giving evidence of a sensitive and somewhat nervous organization, the mental predominating over the physical. The faces are comely, with nose straight or slightly arched, nostrils large, indication strong and full lung capacity, and the line from the nostril to the corner of the mouth, known as the line of success, is sharply defined. During the author's connection with the genealogy of the Tiffany family it has been his good fortune to meet many of its members, and he has never seen a mentally or physically small Tiffany. The complexion is usually dark, but not swarthy, the eyes are brown, dark blue, or dark gray. A blonde Tiffany is practically unknown. Probably the most marked physical characteristic of the Tiffanys is the expression of the eye, which is as positive and distinct as the Maximilian lip is said to be. It is claimed that any person having a drop of Maximilian blood in his veins has full and red lips. The Tiffany eye is the first feature to attract the attention of a close observer. It is bright, giving evidence of temperate habits. Its expresssion changes rapidly with the mood, indicating health and buoyancy, sympathy, grief, determination, or anger, with quickness and unerring certainty. It is a Tiffany mark. The Tiffanys are good livers, and are fastidious in dress. As a race, the Tiffanys are long lived, retaining their mental faculties unimpaired to a good old age. Palmer C. Tiffany, who died in July, 1900 was over ninety at the time of his death, and less than a year before that event he contributed an interesting series of articles to one of the Mount Pleasant, Iowa, newspapers, giving an account of the pioneer settlement of Iowa. These artcles were vigorous, showing an extraordinary memory, and a familiar acquaintance with the history of this Western State. Nelson Arnold Tiffany, father of Nelson Otis Tiffany, when in his eighty-second year, was the youngest of five brothers and sisters in his family living at that time, two of whom died after passing ninety-three. Charles Lewis Tiffany, founder of the famous house of Tiffany & Co., although in his ninetieth year at this writing, goes regularly to his business daily, giving it his close and intelligent attention. He has remarkable vision and is able to read with the naked eye as well as can most of his employes with the use of glasses. "

From my Book

220. Consider Tiffany and 221. Naomi Comstock - (110. Samuel Tiffany; 55. Amy Tiffany; 22. Susan Pardee Darrow; 13. Mary Emily Guild; 06. Harry Emmett Barber; 03. Mildred Barber; 01. George Roger Gilbert)


Consider Tiffany was born in New Shoreham, Block Island, RI on April 28, 1703, the son of Ephraim and Leshia Tiffany. He married November 26, 1731, Naomi Comstock , born in Lyme, Conn. in 1707/8, daughter of William Comstock and Naomi (Niles) Comstock. She died in Lyme, Conn. May 29, 1743 at the age of 36. Consider then married Mary Davis.

Children:

by his first marriage - all born in Lyme, Conn.

1. Consider b. March 15, 1733.

2. Luther b. April 15, 1734.

3. Naomy b. December 28. 1737.

4. Samuel b. July 13, 1740.

5. Umphrey b. March 2, 1743.

married 2nd Mary Davis of New London, Conn. January 23, 175___. Issue: born in Lyme, Conn.

6. Timothy b. November 24, 1752

7. Titus b. May 9, 1754.

Great - Great - Great - Great - Grandparents


110. Samuel Tiffany & 111. Abigail Curtis - (Amy Tiffany, 55; Susan Pardee Darrow, 27; Mary Emily Guild, 13; Harry Emmett Barber, 06; Mildred Carol Barber, 03; George Roger Gilbert,01)

Samuel Tiffany, born July 13, 1740 in Lyme Connecticut, was the son of Consider and Neomey (Comstock) Tiffany. His father was, Consider, the son of Ephraim and Leshia ( _____ ) Tiffany of New Shoreham, Block Island, Rhode Island and his mother was, Neomey, the daughter of William and Neomey (Niles) Comstock of Lyme, Connecticut. Abigail Curtis was born in Connecticut and her parents are unkown to me at this time. Samuel and Abigail (Curtis) Tiffany were the parents of nine children: Jemima, Azuba, Phebe, Mary, Samuel, Nathaniel Curtis, George, Daniel and Amy.

Wednesday, July 11, 1973

Drove to Hartford, Connecticut from Port Jervis, New York and visited the Connecticut State Library. In the Genealogy and History room there are card catalogue files containing Census, Church Records, Vital Statistics, war records, probate files and book shelves of published genealogies.

..............

I found also a Tiffany Genealogy and from that a Comstock Genealogy all of which I will put in the red record book " Herald Square".

In the Tiffany genealogy it was mentioned that Consider Tiffany's wife and Samuel Tiffany's mother was unknown. I looked through the records and found.

Tiffany, Samuel - son of Consider and Neomey, born July 13, 1740 - Lyme Vital Records - Vol. L-6, pg 316.

Tiffany, Consider - married Neomey Comstock, November 26, 1731 - Lyme Vital Records - Vol. L-6, pg 316.

Neomey Comstock's mother was Neomey Niles or Noyes. She is listed in the Noyes genealogy as a daughter of Moses Noyes with a penciled in remark - "wrong - she is the dau. of Benjamin Niles.".

I consulted the records of Births, Marriages and deaths and found:

Niles, Neomey - Dau. Benjamin ; married William Comstock, September 10, 1695 Lyme Vital Records - Vol. L-2, pg 10.

Saturday, May 4, 1974

To the Syracuse Public Library. ...........

From the New England Biographical and Genealogical Record Old Lyme, Connecticut - Inscriptions

Vol. 78 page 376 - Naomi, wife of Mr. Consider Tiffany, died May 29, 1743 in her 36th year, "Behold my children, here I ly."

I based much of my knowledge of this couple on two geneaolgies: TIFFANY FAMILY, MY ANCESTRY compiled by Ella F. Wright Lib. # R929.2 T4395 wr. and THE TIFFANY FAMILY IN AMERICA. I discovered the later of these two first and it does not completely agree with the genealogy by Ms. Wright. The two genealogies agree that Humphrey Tiffany was the original Tiffany in America but THE TIFFANY FAMILY IN AMERICA declares that Samuel was a son of Humphrey's son Consider Tiffany.

2133 SAMUEL (2 Consider, 1 Humphrey). Married, in Lyme, Conn. , about 1760, Abigail Curtis (b. Connecticut; d. Tomkins, N.Y., March, 1829)

Soon after his marriage, Mr. Tiffany moved into New York State, fought in the French and Indian War, and subsequently enlisted as a continental soldier in the War of the Revolution. It is said that he saved his Tory Brother, Consider, from being pressed into service as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Samuel Tiffany was a farmer.

Ella F. Wright's version declares that Samuel was the great-grandson of Humphrey, his grandfather being Ephraim Tiffany, the son of Humphrey, and his father being Consider, the son of Ephraim, not Ephraim's brother Consider as THE TIFFANY FAMILY IN AMERICA states. As happens in many families brothers will name their children after their brothers and many offspring end up with the same names. Telling of which generation they are a part can be very difficult and confusing. Ms. Wright's research shows that Thomas Tiffany, son of Humphrey was born in 1665, thus giving an approximate time for other children's births. She also tells us that Humphrey was killed by lightening in 1685 all his children having then been born prior to 1685.

"From Massachusetts Historical Society, Volumn 14, page 125 - ïJuly 15, 1685, Humphrey Tiffany and Frances Low traveling betwix Swansey and Boston were slain with lightening.' "

Humphrey's son Consider being born before 1685 would have to have been at least 55 and probably was in his 70's when Samuel Tiffany was born in 1740. Ms. Wright's version of Humphrey, Ephraim, Consider, then Samuel seems to be the better argument. Excerpts from that genealogy can be seen above.

I have more confidence in Ms. Wright's research because I was able to duplicate the third generation research just recently.

Wednesday, March 13, 1996

Went again to the Onondaga County Library on Warren Street in Syracuse, NY.

I was mainly in search of the parents of Abigail Curtis who married Samuel Tiffany. I also wanted to check on the authenticity of those members of my family that are reported Revolutionary War Soldiers.

I began with the book "NEW YORK IN THE REVOLTUION" LN48 AMrs which is a long list of the revolutiony soldiers from New York State. ^

..............

My primary purpose was to locate and identify the parents of Abigail Curtis, the reported wife of Samuel Tiffany. Their marriage and birth of their children were reported in the genealogy I have as occuring in Lyme, Conn. so I began with the Lyme Vital Records.

Tiffany -

Consider was born ye 15th of March, 1732/3

Luther was born ye 15th of April 1734

Neomey was born ye 28th of December 1737

Neomey married Ezekiel Huntly

Samuel was born ye 13th of July 1740

Humphrey was born ye 2nd day of March 1743

Neomey the wife of Consider Tiffany died ye 29th day of May 1743

Humphrey was buried Jan. 5, 1788 aged 82


Samuel's marriage to Abigail Curtis must have occurred elsewhere as must the birth of their children. In fact, I lose track of them until they appear as numbers in the 1800 census of Nathaniel Curtis Tiffany in Delaware County, New York.

Samuel was 60 years old in 1800 and his wife about the same. Nathaniel Curtis Tiffany was born about 1763 and would be about 37. Clearly, Nathaniel's mother, Abigail, is too old to be the mother of six children under 10 and Nathaniel can not be the male enumerated as 45 and up. It is most likely that Samuel and Abigail were living with Nathaniel and his family. They were living in Hamden, New York a small Hamlet between Walton and Delhi. The HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 1797-1880 states that Nathaniel C. Tiffany came to Hamden about 1796 with his sons George and Samuel. Since George is listed in the 1800 census and Samuel is not, we might assume that Samuel is still living with his father Nathaniel C. and his grandparents, Samuel and Abigail Tiffany.

Friday, January 26, 1973

Went, tonight, to the Binghamton Public Library.

..........................................

Also looked through Munsell's History of Delaware County 1797 - 1880 and found several interesting entries under Hamden, New York.

Here are the entries:

page 197 - "Pioneers of Hamden"

Among the very early settlers were two brothers George and Samuel Tiffany, young men and sons of one Nathaniel C. Tiffany who came about 1796. We lose sight of the father after he settled the farm below the Shaw farm but George married the daughter of James Mason and assisted very much in the increase of the population and Samuel, a mechanic and cooper, made a useful man in the settlement.

page 196 -

James Mason and his son George made a clearing on the Widow More place in 1795. George was a man grown and soon commenced for himself on land now owned by Charles Russell. Mr. Mason came from Schoharie County and had three sons younger than George, also one daughter, Jane, who married Roswell Peake.

page 200 -

Samuel Tiffany, the son of Samuel the cooper, started a shoe shop as early as 1810 at DeLancey. He was a renter and had his shop wherever his family could find a place. George, brother of Samuel Tiffany, had a son Jeffery Tiffany who worked at the trade and like others at that time ïwhipped the cat'. Samuel Tiffany, Sr., was a cooper as early as 1810 at DeLancey and had a turning shop on the brook there. George, his brother, worked with him.

I went to the Mormon church library to investigate the presence of Tiffany's in Delaware County and found the following records on their microfiche.

Thursday, March 14, 1996

To the LDS Mormon Church to search for Abigail Curtis. Looked at the following Tiffanys and Curtises in the microfiche file. That file contains names of people registered by researchers from the church and elsewhere.

Tiffany

Abigail, relative of George Tiffany in LDS records, who was relative to most of the above entries, b. Mar. 1742 in Conn.

Mrs. Abigail, Nathaniel Curtis m. abt. 1777 in Salisbury, Herkimer Co., NY

Jemima abt 1760 West Meredith

Nathaniel Curtis b. abt 1763 Delaware Co.

Daniel b. Aug. 20, 1779

Polly, May 1, 1787 , Hamden

Dancy b. Sept. 25, 1795

Abigail, George & Mary Mason b. 1797 Hamden, Del. Co.

Mary, Samuel & Mary Sackett 1797 Del.

Betsey b. abt. 1799 Hamden

Polly, spouse Joseph Marvin, b. abt. 1799 Walton

Julia, Samuel and Mary Sackett, Dec. 17, 1799, Del. Co.

Zilpha b. 1799 Delhi.

Thomas Jefferson, Samuel b. 1801 Hamden

Jane, Georg & Mary Mason April 14, 1805, Hamden

Caroline b. abt 1807 Hamden

George, s. George & Mary Mason, May 14, 1807, Del. Co.

Richard Mason, George & Mary Mason July 4, 1810, Hamden

Lorenzo, Samuel & Mary Sackett, b. 1815 Del. Co.

Phebe, George & Mary Mason, Oct. 24, 1817, Newfield, Tompkins, Co.

Samuel, m. Lois Wood 1817 Del. Co.

Anson married Mary Rich 1818 Del. Co.

Lurona, George & Mary Mason, Mch. 28, 1818, Newfield, Tompkins, Co.

Lois, Samuel & Lois Wood 1820 , Hamden

Rachael, Samuel & Lois Wood 1827, Hamden

Ambrose, Samuel & Lois Wood, abt. 1830 Hamden

Harriet, Nathaniel Curtis & Cynthia Smith 1831 Hamden

All of these records from the LDS microfiche are entries by members of the church and they are subject to interpretation by those members. Sometimes wanting the person to be the one you have looked long and hard for can influence your judgement and you may be in error.

Great - Great - Great - Grandmother


55. Amy Tiffany - ( Susan Pardee Darrow, 27; Mary Emily Guild, 13; Harry Emmett Barber, 06; Mildred Barber, 03; George Roger Gilbert, 01) - born December 8, 1783 in Hamden, Delaware County, New York, daughter of Samuel and Abigail (Curtis) Tiffany, she was most likely the last of eight children. Her siblings were Jemima, Azuba, Phebe, Mary, Samuel, Nathaniel and George. She married Isaac Darrow who was born September 11, 1781 in Amenia, Dutchess County, New York, the son of Isaac and Hannah (Mead) Darrow. Her father and mother were married in Lyme, Connecticut, the town of their births. I have no knowledge of the date of her wedding but it must have been close to the turn of the century as Amy's first child, John Tiffany Darrow, was born November 17, 1800 in Hamden, New York, a small hamlet on Route 10 between Delhi and Walton, New York. In 1813 or some time around the birth of her last child, Susan Pardee, her husband, Isaac Darrow, left Hamden on a raft to enlist in the armed services. The war of 1812 was happening. Amy was to never see or hear from Isaac again. He did not return, nor did she receive any information about his whereabouts. He was in his early 30's and she was about 30 with eight children, the oldest of which was about 13. How she survived would probably have made an interesting narrative but I have no information to tell concern-ing it. Amy, by two differing accounts, was either 68 or 74 years old when she died. An accounting of the finding of her probable gravesite and the grave marker date of 1851 can be found at the end of her story. The other death date, 1857, comes from a published genealogy of the Tiffany Family in America whose facts I am trusting to be true. From that genealogy I discovered the names of Amy's parents. Her father's section of that genealogy begins -


2133 SAMUEL (3 Consider, 2 Ephraim 1 Humphrey). (Born Lyme, Conn. July 13, 1740, died Tomkins, N.Y.) ^ Married, in Lyme, Conn. , about 1760, Abigail Curtis (b. Connecticut; d. Tomkins, N.Y., March, 1829)

Soon after his marriage, Mr. Tiffany moved into New York State, fought in the French and Indian War, and subsequently enlisted as a continental soldier in the War of the Revolution. It is said that he saved his Tory Brother, Consider, from being pressed into service as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Samuel Tiffany was a farmer.

Following this paragraph in that genealogy is a listing of their children, the last of which is Amy. A list of her children can be seen at the end of this account. ^

The fact that Tomkins, N.Y. is mentioned in the genealogy suggested Samuel was the correct parent since Tompkins, N. Y. is nearby Walton. I decided to use the Federal Census to find the Tiffanys and where they settled. I did not find a Samuel Tiffany that was 60 years old in any census of Delaware County. I did find a Nathaniel C. Tiffany whose household contained a man and a woman both of whom were older than 45. Samuel Tiffany's child Nathaniel C. Tiffany had no birth date in the genealogy I was using but if he was born after Samuel's marriage in 1760 he would be 40 or younger and the census for Nathaniel C. Tiffany would thus contain himself and his parents. The fact that there are several really young children and some others near marrying age further suggests that some of Samuel's later children might also have resided there. By the history accounts seen on the next page, Nanthaniel C. followed his brothers to this new place probably bringing his aging parents along. This 1800 Census shows that Isaac Darrow , Jr., living in his father's house, lived on the opposite side of John Rich from Amy Tiffany, who was probably living in Nathaniel Curtis Tiffany's house with her father.

Children of Amy (Tiffany), (55), and Isaac Darrow, (54): ^


2149 viii Amy, b. December 8, 1783; d. December 17, 1857; m. Isaac Darrow (B. September 11, 1781). Mr. Darrow enlisted in the regular army and was probably killed, as nothing was ever heard of him after that time.

Children -

3180 John Tiffany - b. Nov. 17, 1800, m. Cynthia Bruce on June 4, 1841had several children.

3181 Affa Ward - b. Dec. 26, 1805; d. Apr. 15, 1875 m. Sept. 15, 1829, Wm. R. Berray b. Apr. 5, 1798 had child (a) Isaac b. Aug. 13, 1831 d. Feb. 4, 1862

3182 Hannah Meade - April 24, 1806 - Mar. 22,1872 m. Feb. 11, 1829 Squire Sherwood -b. Sept. 10, 1802 d. July 26,1875 had

1. (a) Elizabeth Parks, b. July 5,1830
2. (b) Gilbert Townsend, b. Feb. 6, 1832; d. civil war Aug. 21, 1863
3. (c) Adeline M., b. Nov. 16, 1834 d. March 12, 1871
4. (d) Sylvie Mary, b. June 5, 1838 d. March 23, 1928
5. (e) William Wallace, b. March 15, 1841

3183 Mary Cromwell - b. May 9,1808 - Mar. 16, 1900 m. Nov. 7, 1849 Elijah K. Bangs (d. Nov. 18, 1877), S. P.

3184 Anna Hubbard - b. March 27,1811 - Aug 2,1904 -m. William H. Steele ( May 8,1810 - March 21,1879) on June 8, 1834, S. P.

3185 Susan Pardee - b. April 11, 1813; d. July 24, 1890; m. January 1, 1838, Rev. Everett E. Guild (d. May 13, 1880); had (a) Mary Emeline, b. August 12, 1840 d. September 5, 1910