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From my book "Line of Descent of George Roger Gilbert"

1st group:

Notes about Richard Martin

At the Rhode Island Historical Society Library at Providence, in D.A.R. record books of Vital Statistics complied by various Chapters, by years;

In Vol. for year 1956 p. 72 "Abstracts of Wills and Probates of Pawtucket, R. I. from Vols. 1-2 p. 120î

Probate of Will:
Name; Richard Martin of Rehoboth, Colony of new Plimout
Date; June 2, 1686 Probated; May 7, 1695
Wife; None mentioned
Sons; Richard Martin, Jr.; John Martin; Francis Martin.
Grandsons; John Martin (Richard's oldest son)
John Ormsby (Grace's eldest son)
Daughters; Grace Ormsby, Annis Chaffee
Executor; John Martin assisted by Deacon Samuel Newman, and Wm. Carpenter.

From the same reference p. 119

Inventory of estate
Name; Richard Martin
Date; May 7, 1695 entered; May 9, 1695
Son; John Martin
Sister; (means sister of John) Annis Chaffee

From: The Martin Genealogy by Henry J. Martin (1880) Chapter V.

Richard Martin died Mar. 2, 1694. Quotes form his will;

"Item; It is my will that my grandson, John Ormsby, my daughter Elanor's son, shall posess and enjoy and improve my lands on the North of the Town of Rehoboth, divided and undivided, until my grandchildren in Old England come over to make use of them, and if, they never come over ----- the said John Ormsby to have and enjoy them for ever."

Note here that the genealogist uses the name Elanor for Richard Martin's daughter, but at the probate proceedings the name Grace is used, as it is in other records, so I have no doubt that the wife of John Ormsby was GRACE.

B -2 John Son of Richard (A-1) and Sarah (Wanton) Ormesby
b. about 1641 at Saco, Me.
d. Mar. 10, 1717/18 at Rehoboth, Mass. (Reh. VR)
m. Jan. 5, 1664, GRACE MARTIN, dau. of Richard Martin (REH. VR) (see note below)

Children: all born at Rehoboth, Mass.

C-1. Sarah b. Sept. 14, 1665
C-2. John b. Apr. 12, 1667
C-3 Elizabeth b. Oct. 3, 1668 d. Nov. 22, 1668
C-4. Grace b. Nov. 27,1669
C-5. Mary b. Oct. 22, 1671 d. Dec. 25, 1671
C-6. Joshua b. Dec. 9, 1672
C-7. Elizabeth b. Nov. 27, 1674
C-8. Mary b. Apr. 4, 1677
C-9. Jonathan b. Aug. 26, 1678
C-10. Martha b. May 7, 1680
C-11. Jacob b. Mar. 16,1682
C-12. Joseph b. July 8, 1684

References:
Colonial Families in America p. 163
Rehoboth Vital Records


2nd group:

From my notes:

Friday, April 27, 1973

Back to Newton, New Jersey today but to the Sussex County Historical Society. A Mrs. R.(Ann) De Vries, a volunteer worker, helped me find some of the things I wanted to find.

. . . . . There were also a large manilla envelope in another file and I looked through "Cook" (which has information about Savacools),"DeWitts" and "Martins". In the latter I hit the jackpot. There were two volumns of the "Martin Family History" autographed by the author W.J.Coulter, 4/11/1968 and printed by the Wantage Recorder Press, Sussex, N.J. 1931. The first volumn discusses the ancestors of Azariah Martin and was published in 1931. The second volumn is titled "Martin Family History, Descendants of Quartermaster Azariah Martin and Sarah Dunn" and it was published in 1935, the year of my birth. After I copy this I will read the two volumns and place them in the envelope at the back of this Record book. After lunch I had the two volumns copied for me at the Dennis Memorial Library on Main Street in Newton. It's one block south on Main Street from the Historical Society Museum.

THE MARTIN FAMILY

by William J. Coulter

Excerpts from Volumn I:

EARLY ANCESTORS IN EUROPE


The ancestors of the Martin families of America (so far as evience can be obtained, were residents of the northern Counties of France, and later of England. They were industrious, many were well educated and not a few highly intellectual, among whom were scholars, teachers, poets, lawyers, theologians, artists, architects, lecturers, etc.

They were perservering, possessed remarkable will power, were independent of thought, of frank and engaging disposition, not easily overawed and unwilling to submit to unjust treatment.

The first of this name whom we find in England was Baron Martin De Tours, so called from the town from which he came in France. He was one of those who accompanied William the Conqueror from France to England, being a commander in the fleet. It would appear from a study of existing records that the Martins of Somersetshire were probably descendants of Baron Martin De Tours, although no actual proof has been brought to light to confirm it.

The first by the name of Martin on the continent of Europe is supposed to have been St. Martin, the son of a Roman military tribune who was born at Saborie, a city in Hungary about A. D. 316. He died A. D. November 400.

The Martin referred to was educated at Pavia at his father's request, entered the army under Constantine, and later under Julian the apostate. He won fame as a soldier, and upon quitting the army became a disciple of Hilary of Poitiers. He won his Mother to Christianity and withstood a severe prosecution by the Arians with such firmness that he was the first favored by the Latin Church as a confessor of the faith. Upon his return to France about 360 A. D., he founded a convent of Monks near Poitiers, where he led a life of great austerity and seclusion.

In 371, he was drawn forcibly from the Convent and ordained Bishop of Tours. His fame as a worker of miracles drew crowds of people from all parts of France. In order to get rid of their importunities, he kept himself in a convent.

THE MARTIN ANCESTRY

To give you a proper setting for a study of the Martin family, it will be necessary to sketch briefly, what has already been published in other records.

March 20, 1635, a colony of twenty-one families under the spiritual care of the Rev. Joseph Hull, from Badcombe, Somersetshire, sailed from Weymouth, Dorsetshire, England, and landed at Weymouth, New England, May 6, 1635.

Among this group was Robert Martin and wife, Johanna, born about 1591, because their age was given as forty-four years. He was employed as a surveyor and probably was a man of considerable education. On May 13, 1640, he was a freeman.

His first place of settlement was Weymouth; his second Rehoboth, Massachusetts. It appears that he had a brother, Abraham, who was by trade, a weaver, as were many of the early colonists.

The brother died in 1669 and 1670 without heirs, Robert leaving his property to a brother, Richard, in England. Abraham's property went to the children of Richard and John Ormsby, who were relatives.

Of Isaac Martin, who is supposed to be a brother of Robert and Abraham, little is known other than he lived at Rehoboth from 1644 to 1646.

Our ancestor "John Martin" gave evidence at Middlesex Court April 15, 1658, relative to Paul Wilson engaging the affection of his (John's) cousin Priscilla Upham. If John and Priscilla were cousins it is deduced that Elizabeth, the wife of Deacon John Upham, must have been a sister of Robert, Abraham and Isaac, and that John must have been a son of Isaac.

The other brother, Richard, came from England and took possession of Robert Martin's property.

In this connection, we want to state some traditions that we have heard in Piscataway Township, Middlesex County, N. J., where John Martin settled.

One lady, a Mrs. Giles who is a descendant of Benejah Martin, a hatter, of Perth Amboy, N. J. , later of Piscataway, told us that there is a tradition that there were seven "Martin" brothers who came to Massachussets, and that one Martin ancestor came on the Mayflower.

As everyone knows, the only Martin to arrive on the good ship Mayflower, was Christopher Martin and his second wife, Marie Prower. The Mayflower was partly provisioned by Christopher Martin. In Billereay on February 26, 1607, were married Christopher Martin and Marie Prower, widow.

It also appears that Christopher Martin was about fifty years old when the Mayflower sailed and that he had a son, John Martin, who was of age in August, 1620.

The billereay Congregational Church records indicate that Christopher Martin was for some time, a member of the Church at Leyden, Holland.

John Carver and Robert Cushman were sent to England by the Leyden contingent to make the necessary arragements to settle in Northern Virginia and they were joined later by Christopher Martin.

Christopher Martin must have been a man of some importance or influence to be given the job of helping provision the ship.

However, as the Mayflower records indicate, the Martins who came on the ship died the first winter and left no children in America.

Christopher Martin being fifty years old at the time the Mayflower sailed, would make the date of his birth 1570, or thereabouts, and by his first wife would probably have children who were twenty to thirty years old at the time of the sailing. In that connection, it must be remembered that the Mayflower made a second voyage to America in 1629. Also, the name Mayflower was a favorite name for English ships from the Coast of England as a search of English records inidcate.

We mention these various points, in the hope that possibly some day, some one with the time and money will unravel the mystery.

Genealogists and other who have delved into the ancestry of John Martin, of Dover, N. H. , are of the opinion that he was born about 1620 at Durham, England. His wife, Esther Roberts, daughter of Governor Thomas Roberts, of New Hampshire, is supposed to have been born about 1626, probably in New Hampshire, as it is believed that Thomas Roberts came from London to New Hampshire with the Mason expedition in 1623. ( The Captain of one of the early ships to New Hampshire was one John Martin.)

Governor Roberts' people came from Worcestershire to London, and their ancestors came from Haverford, Wales. Thomas Roberts was a member of the Fichmongers Guild in London.

Another authority has this to say of Thomas Roberts: "Thomas Roberts, of Dover, N. H., settled there 1623, one of the founders of the place. Elected president of the Council 1638 and as such was Chief Justice. In 1640, at the Spring election, he was chosen Governor and continued for about a year when it was annexed to Massachusetts, 1641."

His will was made September 27, 1673, and probated June 30, 1674.
Some authorities believe his wife was ___ Yorke.

His children were:

1. Esther, born 1626, married John Martin.
2. John, born 1629, married Abigail Nutter.
3. Thomas, born 1633, married Mary Leighton.
4. Anne married James Philbrich
5. Sarah married Richard Rich.

John Martin and his wife, Esther Roberts, lived at Dover, N. H., and later at Oyster River. The Dover records state they were still there in 1655 but in 1661 were credited to Oyster River.

About this time, the religious situation in New England was not very pleasant and many of the settlers were looking about for a change of scenery. Many of them wished to worship as they pleased and the Puritans who had come into New England were not tolerant.

The Proprietors of the Province of East Jersey were looking for settlers and John Martin became one of the original pioneers.

Volume 29 of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record has this to say:

"The original pioneers to take up land in Piscataway, Middlesex County, New Jersey, under the general terms of the Concessions and Agreements of the Lord Proprietors of the Province of New Jersey were Hugh Dunn, John Martin, Hopewell Hull and Charles Gilman. They came in 1666 from the most northeasterly settlements in New England, on the border line between what is now the State of Maine and New Hampshire. Their Woodbridge, New Jersey friends, from Newbury, Mass., (an adjoining settlement) a short time before had bought for eighty pounds from the Elizabethtown grant of 1664-5, a large tract lying between the Rahway and Raritan Rivers. This woodbridge deed was dated December 11, 1666. Just a week thereafter, December 18, 1666, one-third of the purchase was conveyed to the four persons above named, who called the place, New Piscataqua, at first, in memory of the district they came from in New England. By an endorsement on the deed May 11, 1668, there had been joined to them in the meantime, to their associates, John Gilman, Benjamin Hull, Robert Dennis and John Smith, all from the neighboring localities in the most remote easterly provinces. A provision in the deed specified the speedy settlement of two Townships, no delay must be had in filling this agreement, and others were invited to take up farms within their boundaries. These few (eight) Piscataway planters were soon followed by other friends and acquaintances from New England, as follows:

Francis Drake Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê ÊNicholas Bonham
John Drake Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê ÊJohn Smalley
George Drake Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê ÊBenejah Dunham
John Langstaff Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Jeffrey Manning
Samuel Walker Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê John FitzRandolph
Joseph FitzRandolph Ê Ê Ê Thomas FitzRandolph
Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê ÊBenjamin FitzRandolph
and their mother, Elizabeth, and possibly a few others mostly with wives and children. Although the required number had not arrived 1670-1, the Governor waived all legal objections on their promise to renew their efforts to enlarge the population.

East Jersey, in which Piscataway was located, was first vested in James, Duke of York, and his brother, King Charles the II, next in the Duke of York alone who sold it to Sir George Cartaret and Lord John Berkley and finally Berkley sold his share to Cartaret.

In the early seventies, Holland took over New Jersey from the English and kept it two or three years, during which time it was under Dutch rule.

Then on February 1st and 2nd, 1682, East Jersey was sold at public auction, in London by Cartaret to William Penn and eleven associates for 3,400 pounds (about $17,000,000) and at the time of the sale there was estimated to be 400 people in Piscataway Township settled on 40,000 acres.

John Martin took an active interest in the affairs of the colony and his activity was still apparent two years before his death, when the bounds between Woodbridge and Beaver Dam were laid out in 1685, he and his son-in-law, Hopewell Hull, ran the lines.

In looking over the land records for the period prior to 1700, we find the following members of the Martin family (John Martin and his sons) owning land in Middlesex County, chiefly in Piscataway Township.

1675 - John Martin Sr., 134 acres in Piscataway.
1675 - John Martin Jr., 130 acres in Piscataway.
John Martin Sr., 255 acres in Woodbridge.
Thos. Martin, 80 acres
John Martin, Piscataway in another list is credited 205 acres - 100 acres.
Joseph Martin, 155 acres.
Benjamin Martin, 80 acres.

It will be noted that this makes a total of over 1,000 acres.

No. 1 John Martin Sr. born about 1620, died July 5, 1687, married about 1646 Esther Roberts, born about 1626, died December 12, 1687.

Children:

1. 1. John, born 1647, married 1st Dorothy Smith ; 2nd Anne Brown.
2. 2. Mary, born 1649, married 1st Hopewell Hull; 2nd Justinian Hull.
3. 3. Martha, born 1653, married John Langstaff.
4. 4. Lydia, born 1655, married John Smalley Jr.
5. 5. Joseph, born 1657, married Sarah Trotter.
6. 6. Benjamin, born 1659, married 1st Margaret Reynolds ; 2nd Margaret Elston.
7. 7. Thomas, born 1662, married Rebecca Higgins.
8. 8. James, born 1669, died March 21, 1676, at Piscataway.

In following this line of descent we will first trace the line of Azariah Martin and Sarah Dunn. This second volume will also contain a great deal of information relative to families allied with the Martins, which will be of great interest to the amateur genealogist.

Should there be a demand for a third volume, we will trace out, so far as we have data, the descendants of the other children of John Martin, the pioneer.

The following is a copy of the will of John Martin, second the will of his wife, Esther Martin, both given to us by the Office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N.J.


Will of John Martin, "The Pioneer."

In the name of God Amen, the seventeenth day of March in the year of Grace, One Thousand Six Hundred Eighty-seven.

I, John Martin, of the Town of Piscataway, in the County of Middlesex, in New East Jersey, Yeoman, being in perfect senses & strong in memory, blessed be the Lord though weak in boody & not knowing how soone I shall putt of this earthly Tabernacle & be dissolved, do make, Constitute, ordaine & declare this to be my last will & testament In maner and forme as followeth revoking and disannulling by these presents all & every testament or testaments will or wills heretofore by me made & declared either by word or writing, and this is to be taken only for my last will & testament & all other to be void & of no effect. In the first Resigne up myself in boddy, Soull & Spirate unto the Lord, trusting in his everlasting mercy, hopeing thereby to stand at the Right hand of his eternall Soul in the day of Judgment and in the next place for the settling of my temporall estate, I doe order, give and dispose the same in maner and forme as followeth That is to say first I will order and Require that all these debts & dutyes as I owe in Right or conscience to any maner of person to persones whomsoever be well & truly contented & payed within convenient tyme after my decease by my executrix hereafter named.

Item, I give & bequeath to my dearly beloved wife, Esther Martine, my plantations which lyeth in the Towne of Piscataway aforesd with the house & meadowes & al things belonging ther unto with all my good & chattells whatsoever that shall remain after my decease to be whooly at her dispose either to give, sell or dispose as she sees meet, and thy to whom she shall give, sell or dispose of it to, shall hod it, possess it, enjoy it in as full & ample a maner as if I had sold it, gave or disposed of it to them myselfe.

Item I doe make my dearly beloved wife, Esther Martine, my sole executrix, to execute, dispose, performe & fulfill this my last Will & Teatsment, according to the contents in the several particulars above written.

Item I doe requiest my well beloved sones, Hopewell Hull, John Martine, Benjamin Martine & John Langstaff to be my overseers & assistants to my executrix in the management and disposing of my estate according as is expressed in this my last Will & Teatament.

In witness hereof I have Sett my hand & Seale the day and year above written.

John Martin ( His mark)

Signed, Sealed & delivered

In the presence of us

Thomas Killingsworth,
Benjamin Martin,
Thomas Martin,
Daniel Lyyington.

(Note: - Thomas Killingsworth, the first witness, was an ordained Baptist minister from Norwich, England, and it is quite probable he wrote the will. Benjamin and Thomas Martin were sons of the testator. Benjamin is the ancestor of the Azariah Martin family. Thomas Martin is the ancestor of the Martin family of Ohio and Indiana - see "Martin" book published by C. W. Francis, La Porte, Ind. )

The following is the record of Probate attached to the will:

To all Christian people & others whatsoever to whom these our Letter Testimoniall shall come or whom the premises shall or may concerne the Governor & proprietors of the province of East New Jersey, Send Greeting Know yee That the fourteenth day of December, anno domini, One Thousand Six Hundred Eighty Seven, The annexed last will & Testament of John Martin of the town of Piscataway, deceased, was tendred, proved & approved before us. And he the sd John Martine having whilst he lived, divers good & chattels to be administered within the sd province, and the Right of disposition and granting the administration thereof belonging unto us, wee have & doe hereby committ the administratione of all & singular the good, chattels, rights & creditts of the sd deceased unto Esther Martin, His wife, sole executrix in the sd annexed will & Testament, named truly & faithfully to administer of the same, and a full Just & perfect inventory of all & singular the good, Chattels, Rights. & Creditts of the sd deceased to make & the same to exhibite in the Secretaryes office of the sd province on or before the fifteenth day of December, which shall be in the year of our Lord, 1688.

Given under the Seale of the sd province the day & year first above written.

And. Hamilton.

Recorded in Liber B of deeds, page 220 &.

The following is a copy of the will of Esther Martin, wife of John Martin, the pioneer, as furnished us by the Secretary of State's office at Trenton, N. J.

Will of Esther Martin

In the name of God Amen, the nynth day of November in the year one Thousand Six Hundred Eighty Seven, I, Esther Martin , of the towne of Piscataway, being sick in boddy but of good and perfect memory, thanks be to the Almighty God, and calling to remembrance the uncertaine estate of this transitory life & that all flesh must yield unto death when it shall please God to call, doe make, constitute, ordaine & declare this my last will & testament and non other.

And first being Penitent & Sorry from the bottom of my heart for my sines past, most humbly desiring forgiveness for the same, I gave and commit my Soull unto Almighty God my Saviour and Redeemer, in whom by the merits of Jesus Christ I trust & believe assuredly to be saved & to have full remission & forgiveness of all my sines, and that my soule with my boddy at the general day of resurrection shall rise agine with Joy and throught the merits of Christs death and passione, possess & enherite the kingdom of heaven prepared for his elect and chose, and my boddy to be buried where my executor hereafter named shall appoint. And now for the setling of my temporall estate & such good, chattels & debts ( as it hath pleased God far above my desires to bestow upon me ) I doe order, give & dispose of the same in maner & forme following that is to say first I will that those debts & duties as I owe in right or conscience to any maner of person or persones whatsoever, shall be well & truly contented & payed, or ordained to be payed within convenient tyme after my decease by my executor hereafter named.

Item I give & bequeath unto my sone, John Martin, five shillings.

Item I give & bequeath unto my sone Joseph Martin, three shillings.

Item I give & bequeath unto my sone, Thomas Martin, three shillings.

Item I give & bequeath unto my daughter, Mary Hull the feather bed whereon I lye, also the great chist & warming pan.

Item I give & bequeath to my daughter, Martha Langstaff, one shilling.

Item I give & bequeath to my daughter, Lidea Smalley, one shilling.

Item I give & bequeath unto my grandchyld, Hopewell Hull, son of Hopewell & Mary Hull, my land & meadow within the township of Piscataway To have and to hold the sd land & meadow with the appurtenances thereunto belonging to him , his heirs, executors, administrators & assigns forever.

Item I give to my Sone Benjamin Martin, all my household goods & cattell.

Item I give to my two grandchildren Mary Hull & Hopewell Hull, my weareing appareal as well woollen as linen.

Item I constitute & appoint my sone, Benjamin Martin my sole executor to administer & dispose of my estate according to this my last will & testament.

In Witness hereof I have sett my hand & seale the day and year above written.

Esther Martin (her mark)

Sealed & Signed in the

presence of

Edward Slatter

Samuell Hull

The twentieth day of December, 1687. This day Mr. Edward Slatter & Samuell Hull, the two witnesse to the above mentioned will came before me and did solemnly declare as in the presence of the Almighty God, That they saw the above named Esther Martin Signe, Seale & Publish the above mentiond to be her last will and that at the same tyme she was of sound mynd and memory.

Coram Me

Samll Hull

2. Benjamin Martin (2) (John - 1) was born at Dover or Oyster River, New Hampshire (probably Dover) in 1659, died after 1732; married Oct. 24, 1680, Margaret Reynolds, his first wife, who died Jan. 12, 1687,or 8, and for his second wife married Nov. 19, 1688, Margaret Elstone.

Children by first wife:

1. Benjamin, born Oct. 2, 1681, died Oct. 24, 1682
2. Easter, born Aug. 5, 1683.
3. Benjamin, born Nov. 15, 1685, died 1757; married Fileretta Slater.
4. Jonathan, born Jan. 12, 1687, or 8, died 1768, married, first Elizabeth Dunham; second, Martha; third, Dinah Pyatt.
5. children by second wife:
6. Mary, born April 21, 1691
7. Peter, born Aug. 19, 1693, died 1756, married Mary, second Sarah.

Benjamin Martin was a planter in Piscataway and it was at his home that the Seventh Day Baptist Church was organized, which is mentioned elsewhere in this book under the Dunham ancestry.

According to the New Jersey records, Benjamin Martin died intestate, and we do not know whether his property had been given away to his children or what had happened to it. However, his children had considerable property so we assume that most of it had been sold or given to them.

3. Jonathan Martin (3) (John 1, Benjamin 2) the fourth child of Benjamin, was born in Piscataway, New Jersey, Jan. 12, 1687 or 8, died 1768; married about 1722, Dinah Pyatt, third wife. Children by this marriage; James, born about 1721; Peter and Jacob.

We are not sure whether any of the other children were from this marriage.

Jonathan was a planter and lived in Piscataway as the following copy of his will sent to us from the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, indicates.

Will of Jonathan Martin

In the name of God, Amen, the fourth day of May, in the year of our Lord, One thousand seven hundred sixty & eight. I, Jonathan Martin, of Piscataway, in the County of Middlesex, in the Province of New Jersey, Yeoman being of old age and weak in body but of sound mind and understanding (thanks) be given to Almighty God) and calling to mind the uncertainty of this frail life, and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do therefore at this time make and ordain this my last will & testament, that is to say principally and first of all I resign my soul into the hands of God that gave it, relying on His grace and mercy in and thro the meditation of my blessed Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ and my body I commit to the earth to be buryed in a Christian like manner at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named; and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with in this life, I give, devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form.

Imprimus, it is my will that all my just debts & funeral charges be first of all paid & discharged out of my Personal estate, and what may then remain of my said personal estate, I give the one-third part thereof unto my wife as her porperty forever and another third part thereof I give unto my Granddaughter, Lydia Shotwell, to be her porperty forever and the remaining third part thereof I do hereby order shall remain in the care of my executors & to be disbursed by them to and for the support of my son, William, as they in their descretion from time to time shall see proper.

Item I do hereby impower & authorize my executors to make sale of my lands, situate in the Township of Winsor, in the County of Middlesex, aforesaid, which I purchased from Samuel Dunn as by his deed bearing date the 29th day of December Anno Dom. 1763, refference thereunto being had the same may more fully appear, for the best price that can be obtained and the money arising out of such sale to be put out on interest and the yearly interest thereof to be rendered to and for the support and maintenance of my said son, William, at the discretion of my executors, and after his decease the principle to be equally divided between his lawful issue, Share and Share alike in case he should have any, but in case he, my said son, William, should be without any lawful issue, then in such case the same to be equally divided between my daughter, Catherin, my granddaughter, Elizabeth Hayden, the daughter of John Sutton, my granddaughter Prudence, the daughter of Joseph Howard, share and share alike to them and each of them their heirs and assigns forever.

Item I give and bequeath all my lands which I claim by virtue of the Elizabethtown purchase (Commonly called) unto my daughters, namely; Martha, Anne, Elizabeth, Rachel, Catherine, and Sarah to be equally divided between them in Quantity and Quality, their heirs and assigns forever, not as joint tenants but as tenants in common.

Item I give and bequeath my land in Scituate at a place commonly & formerly called "Rockcitiens" (we are told that this was near what is now know as Succasunna, N. J.) which I purchased from Jonathan Scott & John Scott, the one-half thereof unto my son-in-law, Daniel Dunham & one-fourth part thereof unto my son, Peter, and the remaining quarter part thereof to be equally divided between my grandsons, John Martin & Jonathan Martin, to them & each of them their heirs and assgns forever and it is my request that my Executors use lawful means for the recovery of the possession the same as soon as my be.

Item I give unto my grandson, John Martin, the sum of five shilling Sterling money to debar him from coming in for any part of my estate than what is herein willed to him for every according to the true intent meaning hereof.

Lastly I nominate, constitute and appoint my son-in-law Daniel Dunham & my trusty friend, Samuel Dunham, of Piscataway, afforsd Esqr. to be executors of this my last will and testament given to them and to their survivors full power and authority to act and do as herein directed; hereby revoking and disallowing all former wills by me made ratifying and confirming this & no other to be my last will and Testament.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written.

Jonathan Martin (L. S.)

Signed, sealed, published & declared by the said Jonathan Martin as his last will and Testament in the presence of us, the subscribers as witnesses thereto and in the presence of each other.

Jacob Martin Junr.
James Martin Junr.
Elias V. Court

Recorded in Liber I of Wills, page 313.

No. 4. James Martin (4) (John 1, Benjamin 2, Jonathan 3) is the son of Jonathan and probably his third wife, Dinah Pyatt. We have no birth record but believe it was about 1724, when he was born. He was married on Feb. 25, 1747, to Ruth Dunham, daughter of the Rev. Jonathan Dunham. The latter performed the ceremony uniting them in marriage.

Ruth was born Jan. 3, 1727, see Dunham ancestry elsewhere in this volume. They had the following children living at the time of James Martin's death, althought at that time none of the children were of age:

1. 1. Azariah, born probably 1747 or 8
2. 2. James.
3. 3. Phineas
4. 4. Gideon.
5. 5. Sarah, who probably married a Drake
6. 6. Ruth
7. 7. Jane, probably married James Todd, 1784
8. 8. Esther, who was probably married in Goshen, N.Y. in 1783, to Alexander Eaton.

Records indicate that James Martin was a planter and lived in Piscataway Township, Middlesex County, N. J. , where he died probably in December, 1766, as his will is dated Oct. 25, 1766, and probated Jan. 13, 1767.

The following is a copy of his will obtained from the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J.

Will of James Martin

In the name of God Amen, I, James Martin, of Piscataway in the County of Middlesex & eastern division of the Province of New Jersey being weak of body but of sound disposing mind and memory, thanks be given to Almighty God therefor, and calling to mind the mortality of my body knowing that it is appointed for all men to dye, do constitute, make and ordain this, my last will and testament & Principally & first of all I recommend my soul unto God that gave it, and my body to the earth to be buried in Decent manner at the discretion of my executors hereafter named, nothing doubting but at the General Resurrection I shall receive it again by the Mighty power of God; and as touching such worldly goods or Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life I give, devise and bequeath the same in the following manner:

Imprimis it is my Will & I do hereby Order first that all my just debts & funeral charges be duly paid and satisfied by my executors as soon as conveniently may be after my decease.

Item I give, devise and bequeath unto my well beloved wife, Ruth Martin, my best bed, bedding & furniture thereunto belonging, cubboard, TeaTable, Tea Ware, Two cows, my riding cheer & such a Horse as she shall chuse out of my horses, also the sum of One Hundred & Fifty pounds money at eight shillings an ounce to be her own proper right and by her to be disposed of as she shall think fit, which sum of one hundred & fifty pounds & the other things above mentioned, I give her in lieu of her right of dowry and power of thirds of my estate; I also give unto my said wife two cows, a yoke of oxen, Ox cart, Two horses, Sheep & Swine and all such other things & Household goods as shall be judged Necessary by my executors to keep house with and to carry on the Farming business and also all the profits of my real estate ( untill the time it is hereafter ordered & directed to be disposed of or possessed by my sons) Towards the bringing up, educating & Supporting my younger children, also the free use of so much at my now dwelling house as she shall think necessary with the liberty of pasture for a horse & two cows on the place where I now dwell as long as she remains my widow.

Item I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved son Azariah Martin and to his heirs and assigns forever, all that land & Premises which I last purchased of my brother, Peter Martin, with the tenements thereto belonging, and also the western part of that Lott of salt meadow which I bought of my father, lying between the Great Creek and the Gulf Creek, bounded on the north on said Great Creek, west on David Compton's meadow, south on said Gulf Creek, East on Doctor Martin's meadow, and by him to be possessed and enjoyed at the age of Twenty One years, he paying out of the same the sum of Two Hundred and Seventy pounds money abovesaid, to wit, One Hundred and Twenty pounds to his mother in one year after he is in possession of his lands and to his sister, Sarah Martin, the sum of One Hundred and Fifty pounds, one half when she comes to the age of Eighteen years & the other half when she comes to the age of Twenty Five years.

Item I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved son, James Martin, and to his heirs and assigns forever, all that tract of land or plantation whereon I now dwell with the tenement thereto belonging, and half of that lot of land which I bought of Ebenezer Daniels to be taken of the North end and half of the timber on the other, to wit, the eastern part, Provided he take it off by the time his brother, Phinehas is of age, also five acres of salt meadow which I bought of Nathaniel Heard to be taken off the western part thereof and by him to be possessed & enjoyed at the age of Twenty One years, he paying out of the same the Sum of Two Hundred money abovesaid, to wit, to his Mother the sum of Thirty pounds when he comes to the age of Twenty Two years, and to his sister, Ruth Martin, the sum of One Hundred and Forty pounds, one half when she comes to the age of eighteen years and the other half when she comes to the age of Twenty five years, and to his sister, Jane, the sum of thirty pounds when she comes to the age of eighteen years.

Item I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved son, Phinehas Martin, & to his heirs and assigns forever, all that land or tract of land at the plains which I bought of my brother, Jacob Martin, and the remaining half of that lot of land which I bought of said Ebenezer Daniels, and also four acres of salt meadow lying at Martin's Creek between the Great Creek and the Great Pond which I bought of my father and by him to be possessed and enjoyed at the age of Twenty one years, he paying out of the same the sum of Seventy pounds money abovesaid to his sister, Jane, one half when she comes to the age of eighteen years and the other half when she comes to the age of twenty five years.

Item I give, devise & bequeath unto my beloved son, Gideon Martin, and to his heirs and assigns forever, all the Lott of land at Dimall (this is a swampy piece of ground now about five miles or so north of New Brunswick or Piscataway) which I bought of my father being upwards of Twenty Acres, also Ten acres of land adjoining which I also had of my father, and also all the land which I first purchased of my brother, Peter Martin, being about 30 acres, and the remaining part of the Seven and one half acres of meadow which I bought of my father joyning south on the Gulf Creek and the whole of the lot of Salt meadow which I bought of Hezekiah Dunn, lying on the third reach of South river & the remaining part of the Salt meadow which I bought of Nathaniel Heard, and by him to be possessed and enjoyed at the age of Twenty One years, he paying out of the same the sum of One Hundred pounds money abovesaid, to his sister, Esther Martin, one half when he comes to the age of Twenty One years & the remaining part when he comes to the age of Twenty Three years.

Item I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved daughter, Sarah Martin, & to her heirs and assigns forever, the Sum of one hundred & fifty pounds money abovesd to be paid her by my son, Azariah Martin, one half when she comes to the age of eighteen years; & the other half when she comes to the age of twenty five years.

Item I give, devise & bequeath unto my beloved daughter, Ruth Martin, & to her heirs and assigns forever, the Sum of one hundred and forty pounds money abovesd, to be paid her by my son, James Martin, one half when she comes to the age of eighteen years & the other half when she comes to the age of Twenty five years.

Item I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved daughter, Jane Martin, & to her heirs and assigns forever, the sum of one hundred pounds money abovesd, thirty pounds therof to be paid her by my son, James Martin, when she comes to the age of eighteen years, and Seventy pounds therof, to be paid her by my son, Phinehas Martin, one half when she shall be eighteen years of age and the other half when she shall be Twenty Five years of age.

Item I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved daughter, Esther Martin, & to her heirs and assigns forever, the sum of One Hundred pounds money abovesaid to be paid to her by my son, Gideon Martin, one half when he is Twenty One years of age and the other half when he is Twenty Three years of age.

Item It is my will and I do order that when my wife shall cease to be my Widdow, either by death or marriage, that the movables given her during Widdowhood or such parts thereof as shall then remain, shall be sold and the moneys arising therefrom shall be equally divided between my surviving children and that then my executors shall take care of my children & the lands which are given to each of my sons which shall not then be of age for the uses aforesaid, to wit, the bringing up & education my younger children.

Item It is my will & I do order that if either of my Sons or Daughters should die before they arrive, the Sons at Twenty One years of age or the daughters before they arrive at the age of eighteen years and without issue that then that part of my estate which was given them shall be equally divided among my Surviving children share and share alike.

Item It is my will and I do order that the Tract of land which I purchased of Samuel Mackferson in Piscataway and that tract of land in the County of Sussex which I bought of Levi Hinds & Andrew Smalley, shall be sold as soon as conveniently may be after my decease which together with Such parts of my moveable Estate as can best be spared is to be applyed towards paying my just Debts and funeral Charges.

And lastly, I do hereby nominate, Constitute and appoint my trusty & beloved father-in-law, Jonathan Dunham & my trusty friend, Joseph FitzRandolph, both of Piscataway, my executors of this my last Will & Teastament, and in case of the death of either of them I nominate, constitue and appoint my brother-in-law, Azariah Dunham, also an executor of this, my last will and testament, to see the same fulfilled & performed in every part thereof, Giveing and granting unto my said executors or the Survivour of them full power and authority to sell my estate as above directed and Ordered & to make such conveyances for my lands which are orderd to be sold as the law in that case shall require, holding for good and effectual whatsoever my said executors shall lawfully do in and about the premises, and I do hereby Revoke, disannul & make void all former or other wills & Executors by me at any time heretofore made, ratifying & comfirming this & no other to be my last will & Testament.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal this Twenty Fifth day of October in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty Six.

James Martin (L. S.)

Signed, sealed, published, pronounced & declared by the testator as his last will & Testament in Presence of

Benj. A. Martin,
John Holtom Jun.
Jacob Martin Juner.

Recorded in Liber I of Wills, page 73, at Trenton.

It will be noted by the reader that James Martin died before his father, which is one reason, no doubt, why his family was not mentioned in his father's will, also it is apparent that James Martin was fairly well provided with this world's goods. James Martin is buried near Metuchen, New Jersey, according to records we have found.

No. 5. Azariah Martin (5) ( John 1, Benjamin 2, Jonathan 3, James 4) was the son of James Martin and Ruth Dunham, born probably about 1747 or 1748. He was not of age in 1766 when his father died. Azariah married in 1769 according to our Martin family Bible, Sarah Dunn.

Azariah Martin and Sarah Dunn after their marriage in 1769, lived in Orange County, at one time at Big Island in what is now the Township of Warwick. Whether they came directly there from New Jersey we are unable to state, but we think not. Authorities state that some of their children were born in Piscataway, some were born in Orange County and the rest in Sussex County. However, Azariah lived in Oragne County during the Revolution, served in the Light Horse Co. of 1776 as Quartermaster. The following is the record we have obtained from the office of the New York State Library, Manuscripts and Historical Section, Albany, N. Y., and is dated Dec. 21, 1929.

"Azariah Martin commissioned Quartermaster August 18th 1778, in Captain Ebenezer Woodhull's company of Light Horse, belonging to Blooming Grove, Cornwall Precinct Regiment of Orange County Militia, commanded by Col. Jesse Woodhull (taken from State Archives, Vol. I, Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New York, Vol. 15, page 290.) Azariah Martin signed the Articles of Association at Cornwall Precinct Orange County, May 15, 1775. Azariah Martin with other of Orange County who formed a company of light horse petitioned the Provincial Congress of the Colony of New York that comissions be issued to the officers whom they elected. Petition dated Blooming Grove 27th May, 1776. (Taken from the Calendar of Historical Manuscripts relating to the War of the Revolution, Vol. 1, page 14, 309.) According to a pay abstract of Captain Ebenezer Woodhull's company of light horse of Cornwall, in Orange County in the State of New York, in Gen. George Clinton's brigade, in the service of the United States of America, commencing the 16th day of July, 1776, and ending the 13th day of January 1777, both days included, Azariah Martin, Quartermaster, served forty days. (Taken from the public papers of George Clinton, Vol., 1, page 551".

Azariah Martin was a large man, six feet three inches tall and weighed 260 pounds, possessed of tremendous physical strength and powerful build. He got his start financially during the Revolution, when he raised a crop of 1,000 bushels of wheat and obtain $3.00 per bushel for it. He left New York State and repaired to Vernon Township, in New Jersey, where he continued to raise wheat and buy farms, part of them from Aaron Burr. The writer has seen one deed from Aaron Burr's agent to the Martin family for land in Sussex County. The writer has photostatic copies of two deeds, one of which was a tract that Azariah Martin bought and has on it the signature of Judge Levi Adams. The other deed has the signature of Azariah Martin Jr. and Cortland Martin, brothers and sons of Azariah Sr.

It is also well to recall that it was Azariah Martin's distant cousin, that noted Attorney and distinguished lawyer and Judge who defended Burr when he was placed on trial by the United States Government, namely, the Hon. Luther Martin. It was in Aaron Burr's home that Luther martin spent his last days.

The spot that Azariah chose for his farm in Vernon Township, Sussex Coutny, N. J., was ideal. A strip of 1,000 acres starting near Bissett's crossing (so called because it was a toll bridge kept by a man named Bissett. ...... ) on the Wallkill where the wooden & steel bridge is now located. It comprised a strip about a mile long stretching along the easterly side of the river toward Hamburg and Sussex, and took in both the river bottom lands and a strip along the side of the mountain. The river bottom land is rich and easily worked, some of it is black dirt and there are no finer farms in Sussex County than will be found on this piece. It was here that he raised his family of five boys and two girls, all of whom grew to maturity, married and had families. At one time there were so many of his descendants living in the vicinity, of school age, that there was enough for a school without any outsiders. Old residents tell us that at one time the section where Azariah lived was know as Martintown because of his numerous descendants. This was probably the reason why he left a plot of ground on which to build a school, although so far as we can find, it was never built.

Azariah lived first in a log cabin which was situated where Jacob Martin later lived, now owned by W. Scott Martin, namely, his grandson and great grandson. Another log cabin stood in the field beow the road on what is known as the Thomas Martin farm. Many of those living can remember being in this log cabin.

The late George E. Martin, of Huguenot, N. Y., had very distinct recollections of this log cabin which he used to visit when a boy and living on the farm with his father, Courtland Martin, Jr., on what is now the Fergerson place in Vernon township. This is one of the five Martin farms. Another has a recollection of being there to the log cabin at a prayer meeting, which makes us wonder if this was where the Rev. Teasdale had his first church, in this vicinity. We are told by old residents that there was a Baptist church in this vicinity which was taken down. There are many who would like to know what became of the records.

Azariah Martin had a very large number of relatives who were enlisted in the Colonial forces during the Revolution, among the most noted of whom were Col. Azariah Dunham, of Middlesex County, N. J. and General Wayne a second cousin. We could give a long list of those who served and their relationship but think it hardly worth while.

Sarah Dunn Martin, wife of Azariah, died June 26, 1817, and Azariah died five years later, on Dec. 6, 1822, and were buried in Papakating Cemetery, near Sussex, N. J. These dates are taken from our family Bible.

Their children were:

1. 6. James, born Aug. 29, 1770
2. 7. Courtland, born Aug. 26, 1772
3. 8. Thomas
4. 9. Jeptha
5. 10. Azariah, born Aug. 25, 1784
6. 11. Elizabeth
7. 12. Sarah

There may be some of our readers who will wonder how we know that Azariah Martin lived in Orange County, although he was born and grew up in Middlesex County, N. J. and after the Revolution settled in Sussex County, N. J. The facts as related to us by Mr. W. Scott Martin, of Sussex, N. J., were told to him by his grandfather, Azariah Martin, Jr., (the youngest son of Azariah Sr. ) and are corroborated by a copy of a deed on file in the office of the County Clerk of Sussex County, N. J. in Liber B. of Deeds, page 401, being an indenture made the 20th day of October in the year of 1782, between William Elston, of Hardyston Township, Sussex County, and Azariah Martin, of the Precinct of Goshen, County of Orange and State of New York ( for which he paid 125 pounds) for a tract of land on the east side of the Drowned lands at a place called Dunne Neck, being 125 acres, same being transferred from Cuyler & DeLancey to Elston on April 30, 1774. This ought to be sufficient proof that Azariah Martin lived in Orange County, N. Y. and was still there in 1782. This, of course, is in addition to facts already told us. We might say that this tract is still in possession of the family.

Up to the time of going to press, three of his descendants have joined the D. A. R. on the Revolutionary War Record of Azariah Martin, namely: Mrs. Bessie Martin Coutlter, Mrs. Adell Wadsworth, Miss Abigail DeSombre.

His descendants tell us that Azariah martin was a Justice of the Peace in Vernon Township, Sussex County, N. J., and that it was sometimes necessary to preserve order by main force, which he did to the satisfaction of everybody and to the discomforture of some of the rough characters of that day and age.

Of one thing we are certain, he lived a life that was a credit to the community in which he resided, both spiritually and financially. He and his family were members of the First Baptist Church of Wantage, Sussex County, N. J., which at that period was located in what is now called the old portion of Papakating Cemetery ( Deckertown Union Cememtery.) For many years the old church remained in that location and the Hon. H. A. Van Fredenberg, of Sparrowbush, N. Y., ( an old friend of my mother's people ) tells us that about 1872 to 1878, he taught school at Deckertown ( now Sussex) and that he went to the old Baptist Church in the Cemetery. The Azariah Martin lot was directly in back of one corner of the church.

Later the present church was built at Sussex and the old church in the Cemetery torn down. It seems too bad that this had to be so. Oh, that somebody might (have) had the foresight to keep it intact to be handed down to posterity, because so many of Sussex County's best have gone out from this little church to families who have gone westward and were the pioneers who helped to conquer the great western lands. But alas, the old church perished and we are told the lumber in the house that stands on Walnut St., Sussex. N. J., just to the east of the house now occupied by Anson DeWitt. We do not know the name of the people who live in it.

..............

The following is the will of Azariah Martin as furnished us by the Surrogate's office at Newton, N. J.;

Will of Azaraiah Martin

"In the name of God Amen.

I, Azariah Martin, of the Township of Vernon, County of Sussex and State of New Jersey, being of sound mind and memory and thanks be to God for the same, hoping that the Lord Jesus may receive my soul when my body returns to the dust, do publish this for my last will and testament.

First, I order my executors to take so much of my moveable property as to pay my just debts and funeral charges.

Second, I give and bequeath to my son, Courtland Martin, the place where he now lives which is lot No. 2 according to my division, beginning at a stake and stones which is the division corner between my son, Jeptha and Courtland and said stake and stones is in the third line of my large Parker & Ogden tract and on a course south two degrees west two chains and ninety-three links from the third corner of the aforesaid tract, thence (1st) south two degrees west thirteen chains and twelve links to a stake in the fence; thence (2) south eighty-seven degrees and a half west six chains and sixty-one links; thence (3) north sixty-seven degrees west on to the out line of the aforesaid tract, thence along the out line to Jeptha Martin's line as will be hereafter named to the beginning containing thirty-three acres be the same more or less, also another lot I bequeath to my son Courtland Martin, and to his heirs by his paying the tax that was laid on by the commissioners that was appointed to levy the drowned lands tax and is lot No. 10, according to the division and is a part of the aforesaid tract and lays in the bog meadow beginning in the division line of the bog meadow lots as will be hereafter mentioned and on a course south thirty-two degrees west twenty-three chains from an elm tree standing at the saw mill brook and at the southwest corner of Thomas Martin's meadow and is marked on four sides with a blaze and two notches and is the beginning corner of the bog meadow lots south thirty-two degrees west twelve chains to the northeasterly corner of Lot No. 11; thence (2) along the same north fifty-six degress west to the out line of the aforesaid tract thence along the out line of said tract to the division corner of Lot No. 9, to the beginning as will be hereafter named, containing thirty acres, be the same more or less; also I bequeath to my son, Courtland Martin, Lot No. 5, which is a part of the one hundred and sixty-three acre tract that was purchased of Joseph Sharp, beginning at a stake and stones with trees marked facing the same stake and stones and is the fifth corner of the division line between James Martin's farm and Azariah Martin's farm, thence (1) north ten degrees west sixteen chains and eighty links to the out line of the aforesaid tract; thence (2nd) north seventy-five degrees east eleven chains and fifteen links to the westerly corner of Lot No. 6; thence (3rd) south seventeen chains and twenty links to the beginning corner of lot No. 6; thence (4th) south seventy five degress west eight chains and forty links to the beginning, containing sixteen acres and thirty hundredths of an acre, be the same more or less; also I bequeath to my son, Courtland Martin, all the apples that grows on the trees on what is called my neck lands and what grows on the row of apple trees on the south side of my orchard towards the sawmill brook for the space of seven years after my decease.

Third, I bequeath to my son, Jeptha Martin, and if my son Jeptha Martin should be deceased before his wife, then his wife to draw her dowry so long as she shall remain his widow, but after Jeptha Martin's decease then the land hereafter mentioned I bequeath to my grandsons, viz: three Nathaniel Martin Junr., Thomas Martin Jr. and Joseph Martin, sons of Jeptha Martin, share and share alike among the three after Jeptha Martin's decease the following lots, lot No. 3, No. 11, No. 6., and the one equal undivided half part of seventeen acres and ninety-seven hundredths of an acre bought of Andrew Kirkpatrick and Robert Campbell. I bequeath to my son, Jeptha Martin, as aforesaid so long as his natural life shall continue as aforesaid and all the enjoyments thereof that belongs to the said lands so long as aforesaid and his wife the privilege as aforesaid then to go to the three aforesaid grandsons, their heirs, executors or assigns, the following as they are here described.

Lot No. 3 is the lot where he now lives and is a part of the large Parker & Ogden tract and is the north end of the aforesaid tract bounded on the east by land beglonging to Jeptha Martin and on the north and west by the Maginnes lands and on the south by Courtland Martin's line which begins at a stake and stones standing in the third line of the parker & Ogden tract and on a course south two degrees, west two chains and ninety-three links of from the third corner of said large tract running ____ said division from said stake and stones on a course north fifty-five degrees west to the out line of said tract which boundaries contains fifty acres be the same more or less. Lot no.11, I also bequeath as aforesaid by his paying the tax that was laid on by the aforesaid commissioners and lay adjoining lot No. 10 and is of the bog meadow lots beginning at the second corner of Lot No. 10 and running thence (1) south thirty-two degrees west thirteen chains; thence (2nd) running on a course to the out line of the Parker & Ogden tract north fifty-six degrees west and thence along the out line to the line of Lot No. 10 and thence along the line of Lot No. 10 to the begining, containing thirty acres, be the same more or less, also Lot No. 6, lays in the northeast corner of the aforesaid Sharp tract and is bounded on the west by Lot No. 5 and on the south by the line of James Martin's land containing fourteen acres and a half, be the same more or less.

Fourth, I bequeath to my sons, Courtland Martin and Jeptha Martin, the privilege of cutting one thousand rails a piece of the timber lot, I shall bequeath to my grandson, Azariah Martin Hinchman, but not to cut any chestnut timber and said rails must be cut within seven years after my decease; if not cut within that time there must be none cut and if the rails are not appropriated for the use of fencing their bog meadow lots, I command my executors to prohibit them from cutting any rails, also the privilege of cutting five hundred posts for fencing each on the same terms of cutting the rails aforesaid mentioned.

Fifth, I bequeat to my son, James Martin and to his heirs, executors and administrators, Lot No. 4, the farm where he now lives, containing the saw mill with all the privileges thereunto belonging, said farm lay on a part of the Burr and Sharp tracts beginning at a stake and stones on the east side of the saw mill brook and near the bridge that crosses the said brook, thence (1) south eighty degrees and a half east six chains and sixty-seven links to a stake and stones; thence (2) north twenty seven degrees west four chains and eighty seven links; thence (3) sixty-six degrees and fifteen minutes east ten chains and fifty links; thence (4) north thirty one degrees and a half east nineteen chains and sixty nine links to a stake and stones the beginning corner of lot No. 5; thence (5) north seventy five degrees east sixteen chains and eighty links to the out line of the Sharp tract and thence along the lines of the Sharp tract to the head of the Burr tract and along the Burr line to the most easterly line of the Ryerson tract and thence along the line of the Martin Ryerson line to the division line betweeen Thomas Martin and James Martin as will be herein named and thence along the division line to the beginning, containing one hundred and twenty one acres be the same more or less, also lot No. 9 of the bog meadow lots I bequeath to my son James Martin, by his paying the drowned land tax as aforesaid that will fall on his lot beginning in the aforesaid bog meadow line and on a course south thirty two degrees east eleven chains and ten links to the beginning corner of lot No. 11; thence (2) north fifty six degrees west running to the out line to the division line of lot No. 8 as will be herein mentioned and thence along said division line to the beginning, containing thirty acres be the same more or less.

I also bequeath to my son, James Martin, all the apples that grows on three rows across the east end of the upper orchard for the space of seven years.

Sixth, I bequeath to my son, Thomas Martin, and to his heirs or assigns the farm where he now lives and a lot of bog meadow by his paying the aforesaid tax that will be laid thereon with all the appurtenanaces thereunto belonging, bounding as will be herein described the farm where he now lives as Lot no. 7 according to the division and begins at the aforesaid described elm tree the beginning corner of the bog meadow lots, thence (1) south fifty-three degrees and a half east five chains and twelve links to an ash tree; thence (2) south sixty-five degrees east nine chains and twenty links; thence (3) south fourteen degrees east ninety links to a stake and stones, the beginnning corner of the division between James Martin and Azariah Martin; thence (4) south sixteen degrees west seventy-five links to the first division corner between James Martin and Thoams Martin; thence (5) south seventy-eight degrees east six chains and forty links to a birch tree marked on four sides; thence (6) south fifty-six degrees and a half east ten chains and twelve links; thence (7) south thirty degrees east eleven chains and eighty links; thence (8) south one degree west twelve chains and thirty-six links to the out line of the Martin Ryerson tract thence along the line of the Ryerson tract to the most easterly corner of Lot No. 12 herein described and from said corner running on a course north sixty two degrees west to the line of the bog meadow lots to the beginning containing one hundred and twelve acres be the same more or less. Also the bog meadow lot which is lot No. 8 according to the division beginning in the middle of the saw mill brook, north thirty two degrees east thirty seven links from the aforesaid described elm tree; thence ( 1) south thirty-two degrees west twelve chains to the beginning corner of Lot No. 9; thence (2) running on a course north fifty-six degrees west to the out line of the Parker & Ogden tract, thence along the out line of said tract to the saw mill brook as it now runs to the beginning, containing forty acres, be the same more or less.

I also bequeath to my son, Thomas Martin, all the apples that grows on the trees in the little orchard north of my dwelling house and north of the small brook below my house for the space of seven years.

Seventh, I bequeath to my son, Azariah Martin Junr., and to his heirs and assigns, the farm where I now live which is lot No. 1 according to the division all except the school house lot which will be herein described and the Sharp tract which lays on the neck containing twenty-two acres and seventy-seven hundredths of an acre and also a lot of two acres and forty hundredths of an acre that I purchased of my son, Courtland Martin, and lays adjoining my homestead farm with his paying the sum of one thousand four hundred dolllars to be distributed as I shall herein mention, the farm where I now live is bounded as follows; on the southwest by the herein described line of Thomas Martin's land and on the southeast by James Martin's line as is herein described and on the northwest and northeast by the line of Courtland Martin's land as is herein mentioned, containing about one hundred and seventy-three acres forty-two hundredths of an acre, be the same more or less and also my son, Azariah Martin, is to pay all the drowned land tax that has been herein mentioned aforesaid that is on his lands.

Eighth, I bequeath to my grandson, Azariah Martin Hinchman, or to his heirs or assigns, a lot of land laying at the south end of the Ryerson and Parker & Ogden tract and beginning at the most southeast corner of the Parker & Ogden tract and lays on both sides of the dry brook, said beginning is a stake and heap of stones; (2) south fifty-eight degrees and forty-five minutes east sixteen chains and forty links to the most south corner of the Ryerson tract; thence (3) north thirty-three degrees east eleven chains and forty links thence on a course to the line of the bog meadow lot north sixty-two degrees west and thence along the lines of the bog meadow lots to the out line of the Parker & Ogden tract bounding on Lot No. 11 thence on the south line of said Parker & Ogden tract and thence along the south line to the beginning, containing fifty-seven acres and sixty - one hundredths of an acre, be the same more or less and is Lot No. 12, according to the division. I also order my executors to sell firewood enough to pay the aforesaid drowned land tax that is levyed on Azariah Martin Hinchman's land and to sell of the old timber or decaying.

Ninth, I give and bequeath forever for the use of the public community of this place, a lot of land to build a school on, said lot lays within Lot No. 1 according to my division and lays north of the saw mill brook and south of Azariah Martin Junr.'s barn; beginning at a large grey rock laying on the west edge of the great road and from thence running first south twenty-three degrees west sixty-two feet to a stake; thence (2nd) north sixty-three degrees west forty feet and to run exactly square with those two lines to the beginning containing about six hundredths of an acre, be the same more or less.

Tenth, I bequeath to my daughter, Sarah Adams, seven hundred fifty dollars to be paid out to wit, one-third in one year, one-third in two years and one-third in three years, and to be paid out of the aforesaid one thousand four hundred dollars legacy with the lawful interest is to commence when the first payment shall come due. I also bequeath to my duaghter, Sarah Adams, my dining table and brass warming pan.

Eleventh, I give and bequeat to my graddaughter, Elizabeth Hinchman, the two beds in the room where I now live with all my bed clothes and bedding, bed steads and everyting thereunto belonging and the same in trust of my duaghter, Sarah Adams until she becomes of lawful age. I also bequeath to my granddaughter, Elizabeth Hinchman, two hundred and fifty dollars to be paid out of the aforesaid one thousand four hundred dollars legacy and to be paid unto her at the age of twenty-one and the lawful interest to commence at the end of three years after my decease.

Twelfth, I bequeath to my grandson, Azariah Martin Hinchman, or to his heirs or assigns, one hundred dollars to be paid to him at the age of twenty-one years with the lawful interest to commence at the end of two years after my decease and is to be paid out of the aforesaid one thousand four hundred dollars legacy.

Thirteenth, I bequeath to my graddaughter, Susan Martin, daughter of my son, James Martin, twenty-five dollars to be paid to her out of the aforesaid one thousand four hundred dollars.

Fourteenth, I bequeath to my son, James Martin, my new saddle and bridle.

Fifteenth, I give unto my nephew, James Parkinson Martin, fifty dollars to be paid out of the aforesaid one thousand four hundred dollars legacy.

Sixteenth, I bequeath all the remainder of my estate and the remainder of the aforesaid one thousand four hundred dollars to all my sons, viz: Courtland, Martin, Jeptha Martin, James Martin, Thomas Martin and Azariah Martin, share and share alike, except my son, Courtland Martin, I give him two shares to the one share which is to be paid to them or their heirs or assigns or the representatives of them, their heirs or assigns after settling and paying what is herein written in this my testament and last will.

I appoint Nathaniel Martin, Peter Haynes and Charles C. Backster, executors of this my testament and last will.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this first day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two.

Azariah Martin (seal)

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said Azariah Martin to be his testament and last will in the presence of us.

Gabriel Bross,
Daniel Cornell,
John Sammis "

There are several explanations that we might make in regard to this will, the brass warming pan is now in the possession of Miss Abigail DeSombre and her Aunt, Mrs. Adell Wadsworth, of New Milford, Pa., great granddaughter and granddaughter respectively of Sarah Martin Adams, to whom it was bequeathed.

Now as to the land, the farm bequeathed to Azariah Martin Junior, has passed to his son, Jacob Martin, and from Jacob Martin to his son, Jacob Martin, and from Jacob Martin to his son, W. Scott Martin, of Sussex, the present owner.

The James Martin tract passed, we believe, to his son, Azariah Martin, 3rd, from him to the Tolands and Deckers and finally to W. Scott Martin, who sold it to the present owners of the Lake Wallkill Club where our reunion was held in 1930.

The Thomas Martin tract, we believe, passed to Drake Martin and just how it came into the possession of Scott Martin, we do not know, but he owns it now.

The Jeptha Martin tract passed to his son, Senator Joseph Martin, and from Joseph to Calvin G. Fergerson about 1867, and is now in the possession of Calvin's grandson, Emmett Fergerson.

The Courtland Martin tract passed to his daughter and son-in-law by a joint deed from them to her heirs, namely to Calvin G. Fergerson and his wife, and is now held by his grandson, Emmett Fergerson, of Sussex.

Mr. George Fergerson owned both the Jeptha Martin and Courtland Martin places in addition to other adjoining land, prior to his death in July, 1930. Mr. Emmett Fergerson is his son.